Sacramento nonprofits help 8 migrants who arrived from Texas

Some Sacramento nonprofit organizations are helping eight migrants who unexpectedly arrived in Sacramento last week. The Bexar County Sheriff in San Antonio, TX is now interested in talking with the men to find out who sent them to California and why, and if it’s connected to the nearly 50 migrants’ trip to Martha’s Vineyard from Florida.Meanwhile, Street Soccer USA, a nonprofit that helps raise awareness about poverty through soccer, is stepping in to help the men adapt to their new surroundings.”We are all about creating a safe space for all people to play,” Program Director Reed Fox said. Fox saw social media posts from the nonprofit NorCal Resist, which is providing the men with clothes, food and a place to stay and also getting them to their immigration hearings and asylum clinics. The men arrived Wednesday and Thursday on two separate flights from the same San Antonio shelter where the migrants sent to Martha’s Vineyard stayed.The men said they arrived in Sacramento barefoot and walked from the Sacramento International Airport downtown to the address written on their documents. It was the administrative office for Catholic Charities. The office workers sent them to the Sacramento Food Bank, which in turn called NorCal Resist. “These people are vulnerable and don’t know what’s going on,” said immigration lawyer Jody Santiago. “They don’t know what’s normal so when someone hands them a plane ticket, maybe they think this is from our government.”Santiago has a law firm in Davis and calls the situation “troubling and unusual.” She is also asking if the Sacramento case is connected to Florida.”This is not the act of the nonprofit. There would be no benefit of a nonprofit sending someone across the country with no resources and no means of being taken care of and no arrangements made for them,” she said. Meanwhile, the migrants are getting help now and learning what life is like in Sacramento. “While they are playing on this field, I’m sure they are not thinking about the 20-mile walk they had to take from the airport or just getting dumped on a plane and being sent where they have no idea where they are. They are not thinking about that right now,” Fox said. The migrants said they only spoke to men at the San Antonio Migrant Resource Center and those men took them to the airport. A spokesman for the center declined an interview and has not responded to any questions.The men’s next asylum hearing is set for December.

Some Sacramento nonprofit organizations are helping eight migrants who unexpectedly arrived in Sacramento last week.

The Bexar County Sheriff in San Antonio, TX is now interested in talking with the men to find out who sent them to California and why, and if it’s connected to the nearly 50 migrants’ trip to Martha’s Vineyard from Florida.

Meanwhile, Street Soccer USA, a nonprofit that helps raise awareness about poverty through soccer, is stepping in to help the men adapt to their new surroundings.

“We are all about creating a safe space for all people to play,” Program Director Reed Fox said.

Fox saw social media posts from the nonprofit NorCal Resist, which is providing the men with clothes, food and a place to stay and also getting them to their immigration hearings and asylum clinics.

The men arrived Wednesday and Thursday on two separate flights from the same San Antonio shelter where the migrants sent to Martha’s Vineyard stayed.

The men said they arrived in Sacramento barefoot and walked from the Sacramento International Airport downtown to the address written on their documents. It was the administrative office for Catholic Charities. The office workers sent them to the Sacramento Food Bank, which in turn called NorCal Resist.

“These people are vulnerable and don’t know what’s going on,” said immigration lawyer Jody Santiago. “They don’t know what’s normal so when someone hands them a plane ticket, maybe they think this is from our government.”

Santiago has a law firm in Davis and calls the situation “troubling and unusual.” She is also asking if the Sacramento case is connected to Florida.

“This is not the act of the nonprofit. There would be no benefit of a nonprofit sending someone across the country with no resources and no means of being taken care of and no arrangements made for them,” she said.

Meanwhile, the migrants are getting help now and learning what life is like in Sacramento.

“While they are playing on this field, I’m sure they are not thinking about the 20-mile walk they had to take from the airport or just getting dumped on a plane and being sent where they have no idea where they are. They are not thinking about that right now,” Fox said.

The migrants said they only spoke to men at the San Antonio Migrant Resource Center and those men took them to the airport. A spokesman for the center declined an interview and has not responded to any questions.

The men’s next asylum hearing is set for December.

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