Stockton leads the Atlantic White Cedar | replanting team Local news



A Stockton University team is replanting Atlantic white cedar trees on a cleared cedar stream. The team’s work was part of a larger environmental effort in New Jersey.


Stockton University

The John F. Scarpa Academic Center opens in Atlantic City on Thursday. Stockton University officially inaugurated two buildings on Thursday, one each in Galloway Township and Atlantic City, on behalf of donor John Scarpa. (Video courtesy of Stockton University)


Stockton University, provided

GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP – Stockton University supports New Jersey’s efforts to repopulate Atlantic white cedar trees.

The university said Wednesday that more than 2,500 cedar tree seeds were planted on a cedar swamp clearing on campus this fall.

The work was coordinated by Matthew Olsen, Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences; Kyle Caccamesi, a senior environmental scientist; and Bob Williams of Pine Creek Forestry.

The seeds were provided by the New Jersey Audubon Society and grown by Pinelands Nursery.

“We know that a lot of cedar will occur naturally, but we want to avoid uncertainty,” said Olsen in a statement from the school. “It’s an insurance against Mother Nature throwing us a curveball. There are many deer who love to devour cedar wood.”

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The group also built a barrier of fallen trees around the seeds to prevent deer from eating them.

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Fencing the area is also being considered, Stockton said.

The New Jersey Forest Service has allocated $ 20 million to restore 10,000 acres of cedar forest over the next ten years.

It is estimated that the Atlantic white cedar tree covered 115,000 hectares in New Jersey prior to European settlement and is reduced to about 25,000 hectares according to research.

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