The first elected mayor of Sacramento, Anne Rudin, dies at the age of 97

Anne Rudin, the first woman to be elected mayor of Sacramento, died of pneumonia on Thanksgiving, according to her family. She was 97 years old. Rudin served as president of both the League of Women Voters of Sacramento and the League of Women Voters of California. She went on to serve on the Sacramento City Council for 12 years. She was then elected 51st Mayoress of Sacramento and served the city from 1983 to 1992. The League of Women Voters has a scholarship on her behalf. The Anne-Rudin-Friedensteich in the Landpark area is also named after her. Rudin said in a message her son Jay Rudin delivered to KCRA 3 to be released after her death that she “did not hesitate to address controversial issues.” She listed several examples with self-analysis of the results. Read Anne Rudin’s autobiographical notes here. She also noted that if properly planned, military base closings “did not have to be catastrophic to Sacramento.” “In 1984 I caused a stir when I asked to schedule an appointment with the head of the Pentagon’s Economic Adjustment Bureau on the Chamber of Commerce’s annual capitol-to-capitol trip,” wrote Rudin. “I wanted to know what kind of support would be available to cities and counties if military bases were closed.” When the McClellan and Mather Air Bases and Sacramento Army Depot closed, “the transition from military to domestic use was not easy simple, but it was successful, ”wrote Rudin. Back then to support the Mayor of Stockton, who moved to be banned from Cleveland Elementary School in 1989 after a fatal shootout. “It was a useless but well-intentioned gesture, maybe a little naive, but I wanted to show that a gun control position doesn’t lose an election. Unfortunately, other cities have not followed our lead. “Rudin also talked about achieving” incremental “changes in gay rights over two decades,” she wrote. “That lasted until the end of my second term in 1992 when I succeeded in enacting a civil partner ordinance. ”Rudin wrote that she also campaigned for women’s rights by helping female employees organize a women’s committee“ to support women, especially in non-traditional jobs, who were harassed by male employees. ” Regarding campaign funding, Rudin wrote that she had passed several ordinances that were overturned by court rulings. These efforts are “a hopeless thing,” she wrote. Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg called Rudin “decent” and “tough” in a statement on Saturday. “She was one of the first to recognize that LGBTQ rights are basic civil rights. She recognized the opportunities to turn military bases into economic opportunities early on. She broke through the glass ceiling and became Sacramento’s first elected mayor. She was decent, tough, and always sublime “The best values ​​of Sacramento.” Rudin was born the eldest of three children to Philip Note and Angelina Macri. Their father, an immigrant from Sicily, fought with US forces in France during World War I. Her mother, who also had Sicilian roots , grew up in New Jersey. Rudin met her husband, Dr. Edward Rudin, while he was a medical student at Temple University. Anne Rudin received her BA in Education from Temple and became a nurse after attending Temple University Hospital School of Nursing and worked there as a nursing teacher, she also has a master’s degree in public administration ng from the University of Southern California and worked at Mt. Zion Hospital School of Nursing in San Francisco before taking a career break while raising four children in Riverside and Sacramento. During her stint on the Sacramento City Council, Rudin considered one of her highlights for speaking out against development along the Sacramento River levee, and suggested that Sacramento County take responsibility for dispatching and funding emergency services and the first ever smoking ordinance from Sacramento introduces. But Rudin wrote that she viewed her family’s inheritance as her “most important achievement”. She and her husband “raised four children who have a social conscience and whom they have taught their own children. All four, like their children, are self-sufficient and engaged in rewarding endeavors and careers of value to the communities ”. in which they live. They have helped me with their spouses, each other and the community. ”

Anne Rudin, the first woman to be elected mayor of Sacramento, died of pneumonia on Thanksgiving, according to her family. She was 97.

Rudin was president of the League of Women Voters of Sacramento and the League of Women Voters of California.

She went on to serve on the Sacramento City Council for 12 years. She was then elected the 51st mayor of Sacramento and served the city from 1983 to 1992.

The League of Women Voters has a scholarship on their behalf. The Anne-Rudin-Friedensteich in the Landpark area is also named after her.

Rudin said in a message her son Jay Rudin delivered to KCRA 3 to be released after her death that she “did not hesitate to address controversial issues.” She listed several examples with self-analysis of the results.

In the message, Rudin stressed that she had voted against the rezoning of the North Natomas area in support of what would become the Arco Arena, believing the city should have focused on the needs of older areas of the city. She also noted that if properly planned, military base closings “did not have to be catastrophic to Sacramento.”

“In 1984 I caused a stir when I asked to schedule an appointment with the head of the Pentagon’s Economic Adjustment Bureau on the Chamber of Commerce’s annual capitol-to-capitol trip,” wrote Rudin. “I wanted to know what help is available for cities and districts in the event of military bases being closed.”

When McClellan and Mather Air Force Bases and the Sacramento Army Depot closed, “the transition from military to domestic use was neither easy nor easy, but it was successful,” wrote Rudin.

She also highlighted work on a local ordinance banning the sale and possession of assault weapons in Sacramento, which was eventually replaced by a state ban.

Rudin felt at the time “morally obliged” to support the Mayor of Stockton, who requested a ban after a fatal shooting at Cleveland Elementary School in 1989.

“Banning guns in one city would be useless if they were easy to get in neighboring cities,” she wrote. “It was a useless but well-intentioned gesture, maybe even a little naive, but I wanted to show that a gun control position does not lose elections. Unfortunately, other cities have not followed our example.”

Rudin also spoke of making “incremental” changes in gay rights over two decades.

“It started when I went to see the police chief shortly after I was first elected to the city council in 1971 on behalf of a voter who felt discriminated against for wearing women’s clothing,” she wrote. “It was not until the end of my second term as mayor in 1992 that I succeeded in enacting a civil partner ordinance.”

Rudin wrote that she also advocated women’s rights by helping female employees organize a women’s committee “to support women, particularly in the nontraditional professions harassed by male employees.”

She said she supported on-site childcare for workers in private companies.

Regarding campaign funding, Rudin wrote that she had passed several ordinances that were overturned by court rulings. These efforts are “a hopeless thing,” she wrote.

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg called Rudin “decent” and “tough” in a statement on Saturday.

“Mayor Anne Rudin was always a leader ahead of her time,” said Steinberg. “She was one of the first to recognize that LGBTQ rights are basic civil rights. She recognized the opportunities to turn military bases into economic opportunities early on. She broke through the glass ceiling and became Sacramento’s first elected mayor. She was decent, tough, and always sublime “the best values ​​of Sacramento.”

Rudin was born as the eldest of three children of Philip Note and Angelina Macri. Her father, an immigrant from Sicily, fought with US forces in France during World War I. Her mother, who also had Sicilian roots, grew up in New Jersey.

Rudin met her husband Dr. Edward Rudin as a medical student at Temple University. Anne Rudin received her BA in Education from Temple and after attending Temple University Hospital School of Nursing also became a nurse and worked there as a nursing teacher.

She also holds a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Southern California and worked at Mt. Zion Hospital School of Nursing in San Francisco before taking a career break while raising four children in Riverside and Sacramento.

During her stint on the Sacramento City Council, Rudin considered one of her highlights in speaking out against development along the Sacramento River levee and suggested that Sacramento County take responsibility for dispatching and funding emergency services and the Sacramento First Smoking Ordinance introduces.

But Rudin wrote that she viewed her family’s inheritance as her “most important achievement”.

She and her husband raised “four children who have a social conscience and who in turn have taught their own children to live with. They have helped me with their spouses, each other and the community. “

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