‘Good Night Lights’ brings holiday joy to Shriners patients

For the fourth year in a row, first responders spread holiday cheer to the children at Shriners Children’s Northern California by flashing their vehicle lights. While the event is geared toward putting a smile on the faces of the youth, for Sacramento firefighter Ryan Hatfield, participating in “Good Night Lights” came full circle for him. He was a patient at Shriners when he was 12 years old after breaking his back, so giving back to the kids who are now patients meant the world to him.”It’s pretty emotional. Like when I think about it, I might even tear up about it,” Hatfield said. “It’s such a good thing for me and for everyone in our department to be able to come out here and just make these kids have one good night.”Sacramento police and fire personnel on Tuesday evening filled the front parking circle of the hospital to bring a holiday light show to the Shriners patients. Those patients used flashlights to join the fun, shining their own lights through the window to the first responders down below. Wyatt, an 11-year-old patient at the hospital, called the event “cool.””Good Night Lights” was started by Michelle O’Hara, who is the manager of the Therapeutic Recreation and Child Life department at Shriners. She said the event is meant to spread holiday cheer.”It’s a nice way to really spend the holiday season focusing on the joy and the happiness of it, versus being in a hospital,” O’Hara said. “It’s something that gives us a story that has nothing to do with hospital life, nothing to do with medications or procedures or something like that.” Shriners said the event happens on Tuesdays in December ahead of Christmas. While the final event of this holiday season has wrapped up, Shriners staff said they already cannot wait for next year.”It’s just a wonderful feeling to be able to make that connection and to be able to see them have a little holiday joy,” Sacramento Police Department spokesperson Ryan Woo said.

For the fourth year in a row, first responders spread holiday cheer to the children at Shriners Children’s Northern California by flashing their vehicle lights.

While the event is geared toward putting a smile on the faces of the youth, for Sacramento firefighter Ryan Hatfield, participating in “Good Night Lights” came full circle for him. He was a patient at Shriners when he was 12 years old after breaking his back, so giving back to the kids who are now patients meant the world to him.

“It’s pretty emotional. Like when I think about it, I might even tear up about it,” Hatfield said. “It’s such a good thing for me and for everyone in our department to be able to come out here and just make these kids have one good night.”

Sacramento police and fire personnel on Tuesday evening filled the front parking circle of the hospital to bring a holiday light show to the Shriners patients. Those patients used flashlights to join the fun, shining their own lights through the window to the first responders down below. Wyatt, an 11-year-old patient at the hospital, called the event “cool.”

“Good Night Lights” was started by Michelle O’Hara, who is the manager of the Therapeutic Recreation and Child Life department at Shriners. She said the event is meant to spread holiday cheer.

“It’s a nice way to really spend the holiday season focusing on the joy and the happiness of it, versus being in a hospital,” O’Hara said. “It’s something that gives us a story that has nothing to do with hospital life, nothing to do with medications or procedures or something like that.”

Shriners said the event happens on Tuesdays in December ahead of Christmas. While the final event of this holiday season has wrapped up, Shriners staff said they already cannot wait for next year.

“It’s just a wonderful feeling to be able to make that connection and to be able to see them have a little holiday joy,” Sacramento Police Department spokesperson Ryan Woo said.

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