Sacramento-based group raises awareness about violence toward street vendors

Communities across Northern California are celebrating Dia de los Muertos, honoring deceased friends and family members. Brown Issues, a youth-centered leadership organization devoted to the advancement of underserved communities based in Sacramento, is using the holiday to bring awareness to violence against street vendors. Kimberly Gudino organizes programming for Brown Issues chapters across the state. She created an altar at the Latino Center for Arts and Culture with her mom Cecilia, who has been a street vendor in the south Sacramento area for more than 15 years.”Ever since I was a little girl, my mom has been taking me with her to help her vend,” Gudino said. She is hoping to highlight an important issue: the murders of street vendors killed while on the job.”We have the pictures of three vendors, Lorenzo Perez and Jose Luis Rivera, who were both murdered in Fresno, California,” Gudino said. “We also have a photo of Severino “Elias” Gutierrez, who was murdered in Gardena, California.”The topic is just one focus of her work with Brown Issues, a statewide group dedicated to cultivating the next generation of Latino leaders. Gudino joined As a senior in high school. She moved on to lead the Brown Issues chapter at Sacramento State. Now at 25, she’s taken a leadership role, organizing programming at more than 20 middle school, high school, and college campuses across California a group of community college students who wanted to volunteer their time with students at Luther Burbank High School to address gun and gang violence in the city.To Gudino, the goal of the group is to make sure that the Latino community is represented everywhere.And if it isn’t she aims to help cultivate the next generation that will continue working toward the goal of fighting for representation, the safety measures for street vendors and other topics dear to the community.”We want to ma ke sure that people don’t forget what’s happening to our people who are out there working every single day from sunrise to sunset providing for their family,” Gudino said.She said sharing experiences like this is what Brown Issues is all about.”To Me, it’s been about amplifying the struggles of the Latino community, but also the beauty of our culture, and that we’re here and doing beautiful things,” Gudino said.

Communities across Northern California are celebrating Dia de los Muertos, honoring deceased friends and family members.

Brown Issues, a youth-centered leadership organization devoted to the advancement of underserved communities based in Sacramento, is using the holiday to bring awareness to violence against street vendors.

Kimberly Gudino organizes programming for Brown Issues chapters across the state. She created an altar at the Latino Center for Arts and Culture with her mom Cecilia, who has been a street vendor in the south Sacramento area for more than 15 years.

“Ever since I was a little girl, my mom has been taking me with her to help her vend,” Gudino said.

She is hoping to highlight an important issue: the murders of street vendors killed while on the job.

“We have the pictures of three vendors, Lorenzo Perez and Jose Luis Rivera, who were both murdered in Fresno, California,” Gudino said. “We also have a photo of Severino “Elias” Gutierrez, who was murdered in Gardena, California. “

The topic is just one focus of her work with Brown Issues, a statewide group dedicated to cultivating the next generation of Latino leaders.

Gudino joined as a senior in high school. She moved on to lead the Brown Issues chapter at Sacramento State. Now at 25, she’s taken a leadership role, organizing programming at more than 20 middle school, high school, and college campuses across California.

She recalled a group of community college students who wanted to volunteer their time with students at Luther Burbank High School to address gun and gang violence in the city.

To Gudino, the goal of the group is to make sure that the Latino community is represented everywhere. And if it isn’t she aims to help cultivate the next generation that will continue working toward the goal of fighting for representation, the safety measures for street vendors and other topics dear to the community.

“We want to make sure that people don’t forget what’s happening to our people who are out there working every single day from sunrise to sunset providing for their family,” Gudino said.

She said sharing experiences like this is what Brown Issues is all about.

“To me, it’s been about amplifying the struggles of the Latino community, but also the beauty of our culture, and that we’re here and doing beautiful things,” Gudino said.

Comments are closed.