Sacramento daycares use COVID-era safety measures amid RSV spike

California is seeing an increase in child hospitalizations for Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, prompting parents to take steps in protecting their children. Meanwhile, people are taking steps to also protect themselves against COVID-19 and the flu. Despite the uptick, hospital systems like UC Davis and Kaiser Permanente said that unlike other hospitals in the state, they’re not overwhelmed and have the capacity to treat all their patients.”We’re seeing enough positive tests that we’ve pulled the trigger on the administration of monoclonal antibody access for those most at risk for severe RSV infections, such as prematurely born infants,” said Dr. Dean Blumberg, professor-in-chief of pediatric infectious diseases at UC Davis Children’s Hospital.The wave of children contracting the respiratory virus in the Golden State comes slower than what has been happening nationally in recent weeks.Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data show a three-week moving average of the virus since 2020, and both the antigen and the PCR positive tests are higher this time around than compared to last year when the peak was seen in December.Daycares in the Sacramento area have also seen children contract the disease, including Little Big Time Child Development Center. Alexis Castaneda, the school director, said they are sending children home with at-home COVID-19 tests if they show symptoms of being sick and in some cases ask for a doctor’s note to return to the center.KCRA 3 spoke to several Sacramento- area daycares over the phone and all of them said they are keeping certain pandemic safety measures in place.”We still do COVID protocols, so we take temperatures of everybody including staff as they enter the facility, and then we also do like clean pens, dirty pens so nobody has to double touch. We still have hand sanitizer, and face masks at the entrance,” said Castaneda.There are at-home antigen tests to detect RSV and PCR tests can be done with a medical provider.RSV common symptoms : FeverDry coughTirednessLess common RSV symptoms:Aches and painsSore throatDiarrheaConjunctivitisHeadacheLoss of taste or smella rash on the skin, or discoloration of fingers or toesSerious RSV symptoms:Difficulty breathing or shortness of breathChest pain or pressure eLoss of speech or movement

California is seeing an increase in child hospitalizations for Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, prompting parents to take steps in protecting their children. Meanwhile, people are taking steps to also protect themselves against COVID-19 and the flu.

Despite the uptick, hospital systems like UC Davis and Kaiser Permanente said that unlike other hospitals in the state, they’re not overwhelmed and have the capacity to treat all their patients.

“We’re seeing enough positive tests that we’ve pulled the trigger on the administration of monoclonal antibody access for those most at risk for severe RSV infections, such as prematurely born infants,” said Dr. Dean Blumberg, professor-in-chief of pediatric infectious diseases at UC Davis Children’s Hospital.

The wave of children contracting the respiratory virus in the Golden State comes slower than what has been happening nationally in recent weeks.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data show a three-week moving average of the virus since 2020, and both the antigen and the PCR positive tests are higher this time around than compared to last year when the peak was seen in December.

Daycares in the Sacramento area have also seen children contract the disease, including Little Big Time Child Development Center. Alexis Castaneda, the school director, said they are sending children home with at-home COVID-19 tests if they show symptoms of being sick and in some cases ask for a doctor’s note to return to the center.

KCRA 3 spoke to several Sacramento-area daycares over the phone and all of them said they are keeping certain pandemic safety measures in place.

“We still do COVID protocols, so we take temperatures of everybody including staff as they enter the facility, and then we also do like clean pens, dirty pens so nobody has to double touch. We still have hand sanitizer, and face masks at the entrance,” said Castaneda.

There are at-home antigen tests to detect RSV and PCR tests can be done with a medical provider.

RSV common symptoms:

Less common RSV symptoms:

  • Aches and pains
  • Sore Throat
  • diarrhea
  • conjunctivitis
  • headache
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • a rash on the skin, or discoloration of fingers or toes

Serious RSV symptoms:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Chest pain or pressure
  • Loss of speech or movement

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