Sacramento Mayor responds number of hate related incidents

Sacramento is seeing an increase in hate crimes reported in the city, with the numbers more than doubling from 2020 to 2021.”It’s alarming, it’s a warning and it’s a call to action,” said Mayor Darrell Steinberg in response to KCRA’s breakdown of hate -related crimes in the city. In the first nine months of 2021, there were 126 bias-related incidents reported to Sacramento police.The mayor said after looking at the numbers, he feels more people need to be speaking out instead of being silent”The more we do that the more we strengthen the bonds of community and the more we elevate the truth that people of goodwill, if they speak up, you may not prevent the next incident from happening, but you do not allow the haters to become the silent or vocal majority,” said Steinberg. Former Sacramento police chief Daniel Hanh said the fear of coming forward plays a major factor in how many incidents are actually reported.”Hate crimes are different than other crimes. They’re very personal. I think there is a lot of reluctance depending on what the crime is because you’re concerned of what’s going to happen tomorrow,” Hanh said.Hanh and other city leaders say it’s important to take a look at history when breaking down the recent numbers. “You have a lot of factors going into it between COVID, what happened with George Floyd. All of those things have unleashed a lot of emotions for people, but at the other end of the spectrum I hope this is not Sacramento,” said Jay Schenirer, city council member for District 5. For many, the root of it all falls on education “I think there is also a lot of denial, especially here in California. I run into so many people that say ‘we’re California, we didn’t have all of that stuff, that was all in the south’ or ‘that was all a really long time ago,’ but we had it all,” Hanh said.”We need to work together whether it’s community-based organizations, city of Sacramento coming together and thinking about the kind of community we want to be and what that’s going to take and then how do we teach our kids,” Schenirer said .| Interactive | Hate incident reports have increased fivefold in Sacramento since 2017. Take a closer look below

Sacramento is seeing an increase in hate crimes reported in the city, with the numbers more than doubling from 2020 to 2021.

“It’s alarming, it’s a warning and it’s a call to action,” said Mayor Darrell Steinberg in response to KCRA’s breakdown of hate-related crimes in the city.

In the first nine months of 2021, there were 126 bias-related incidents reported to Sacramento police.

The mayor said after looking at the numbers, he feels more people need to be speaking out instead of being silent

“The more we do that the more we strengthen the bonds of community and the more we elevate the truth that people of goodwill, if they speak up, you may not prevent the next incident from happening, but you do not allow the haters to become the silent or vocal majority,” said Steinberg.

Former Sacramento police chief Daniel Hanh said the fear of coming forward plays a major factor in how many incidents are actually reported.

“Hate crimes are different than other crimes. They’re very personal. I think there is a lot of reluctance depending on what the crime is because you’re concerned of what’s going to happen tomorrow,” Hanh said.

Hanh and other city leaders say it’s important to take a look at history when breaking down the recent numbers.

“You have a lot of factors going into it between COVID, what happened with George Floyd. All of those things have unleashed a lot of emotions for people, but at the other end of the spectrum I hope this is not Sacramento,” said Jay Schenirer, city council member for District 5.

For many, the root of it all falls on education.

“I think there is also a lot of denial, especially here in California. I run into so many people that say ‘we’re California, we didn’t have all of that stuff, that was all in the south’ or ‘that was all a really long time ago,’ but we had it all,” Hanh said.

“We need to work together whether it’s community-based organizations, city of Sacramento coming together and thinking about the kind of community we want to be and what that’s going to take and then how do we teach our kids,” Schenirer said.

| Interactive | Hate incident reports have increased fivefold since 2017 in Sacramento. Take a closer look below

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