Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps provides jobs for youth

Not all jobs require you to get your hands dirty, and most would agree that the Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps is a bit more trashy than others.”Yeah it can be very gross,” said 22-year-old Malia McAdams. “Sometimes there are maggots in here, moldy food.”McAdams started working at the SRCC a couple of months ago. The SRCC is the city’s largest education and workforce training program hiring only 18 to 26-year-olds.”Well that’s an age group that is under severed and also that’s an age group that sometimes needs to be redirected and receive skills and training and certifications to help them get to the path of full employment,” said SRCC Executive Director Paula Birdsong. These young people are getting life skills.”It’s from 7 to 3:30,” McAdams added. “That’s an eight-hour gap where they are being productive and not just out in the streets, smoking or drinking or doing whatever.”KCRA 3 caught McAdams and her crew sorting recycling. It’s not at all glamorous, but it’s giving them a chance to recycle their lives.”It helps the community for the future because it trains us as young adults for the future,” Turner said. But it’s a job paying real money.”Definitely this part of the conservation corps is the dirty jobs,” Turner said. “Everything is not the dirty jobs .Everything else is labor.”That inclu des teaming up with the city to help keep ditches and city streets manicured.”Out here is much more than what you think landscaping and maintaining vegetation would be,” said Emilio Barrera. “We are doing fire breaks and working with the city. There’s a lot of things that you wouldn’t do on a day to day basis” This story was produced as part of Project Community: Saving Our Cities. The series airs on KCRA 3 and online Monday through Friday the entire month of May each night during the 6 pm News. We’re focusing on those working to make our communities safer and help our youth thrive, especially in neighborhoods facing social and economic disparities. Here are more stories from the Saving Our Cities series: The reality of crime. Is it headed up or down? ‘Saving one life, one cast at a time’: Man turns life around, now uses fishing to keep teens away from violenceA once-troubled Vacaville youth’s firefighter goals, and the educator who inspired her Northern California lawmakers respond to questions about reducing violence and crime

Not all jobs require you to get your hands dirty, and most would agree that the Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps is a bit more trashy than others.

“Yeah it can be very big,” said 22-year-old Malia McAdams. “Sometimes there are maggots in here, moldy food.”

McAdams started working at the SRCC a couple of months ago. The SRCC is the city’s largest education and workforce training program hiring only 18 to 26-year-olds.

“Well that’s an age group that is under severed and also that’s an age group that sometimes needs to be redirected and receive skills and training and certifications to help them get to the path of full employment,” said SRCC Executive Director Paula Birdsong.

These young people are getting life skills.

“It’s from 7 to 3:30,” McAdams added. “That’s an eight-hour gap where they are being productive and not just out in the streets, smoking or drinking or doing whatever.”

KCRA 3 caught McAdams and her crew sorting recycling. It’s not at all glamorous, but it’s giving them a chance to recycle their lives.

“It helps the community for the future because it trains us as young adults for the future,” Turner said.

But it’s a job paying real money.

“Definitely this part of the conservation corps is the dirty jobs,” Turner said. “Everything is not the dirty job. Everything else is labor.”

That includes teaming up with the city to help keep ditches and city streets manicured.

“Out here is much more than what you think landscaping and maintaining vegetation would be,” said Emilio Barrera. “We are doing fire breaks and working with the city. There’s a lot of things that you wouldn’t do on a day to day basis”

This story was produced as part of Project Community: Saving Our Cities. The series airs on KCRA 3 and online Monday through Friday the entire month of May each night during the 6 pm News. We’re focusing on those working to make our communities safer and help our youth thrive, especially in neighborhoods facing social and economic disparities.

Here are more stories from the Saving Our Cities series:

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