Sacramento’s River District moves forward with plans for new housing, commercial space

Plans to revitalize a section of Sacramento’s River District are moving forward following city council approval Tuesday night. Advocates for the new Grower’s District said Wednesday they want to move quickly with the privately funded, mixed-use development slated to be built across three sites on North 16th Street in Sacramento.”Look what we have here: We have a piece of ground that is as big as our city center, and it’s right next to a beautiful stretch of the American River, but it’s rundown commercial, neglected buildings. A lot of buildings are in bad condition, but it is a historic district,” said city Councilmember Jeff Harris of District 3. Harris explained that years ago, the horseshoe-shaped space was used to sell produce, but the area has declined over the years despite its potential. “I’ve always believed the River District had amazing potential,” Harris said. He said he drew inspiration from Portland’s Pearl District as he and others worked to move the idea for the project forward over nearly a decade. Harris said a consultant from Oregon actually traveled to Sacramento to help create a “vision statement” for the River District in the early stages of development.”I’m really excited about it,” he said. “It really pays homage to the historic aspect of the River District, which was of course the produce district in Sacramento for many, many years.”He said, moving forward, the developer will not need city council approval. The next step, he said, is to finalize building plans and obtain permits.The plans currently include 525 housing units and commercial space geared towards startups and entrepreneurial opportunities. It is expected rent for both the housing units — expected to be mainly smaller studio spaces — and the commercial spaces would be relatively inexpensive due to the area in which they are building.”It’s really focused on younger people, millennials, the entrepreneurial spirit of younger people,” he said. Harris said he hoped construction would start in 2023 with “substantial buildout” within three years.

Plans to revitalize a section of Sacramento’s River District are moving forward following city council approval Tuesday night.

Advocates for the new Grower’s District said Wednesday they want to move quickly with the privately funded, mixed-use development slated to be built across three sites on North 16th Street in Sacramento.

“Look what we have here: We have a piece of ground that is as big as our city center, and it’s right next to a beautiful stretch of the American River, but it’s rundown commercial, neglected buildings. A lot of buildings are in bad condition, but it is a historic district,” said city council member Jeff Harris of District 3.

Harris explained that years ago, the horseshoe-shaped space was used to sell produce, but the area has declined over the years despite its potential.

“I’ve always believed the River District had amazing potential,” Harris said.

He said he drew inspiration from Portland’s Pearl District as he and others worked to move the idea for the project forward over nearly a decade. Harris said a consultant from Oregon actually traveled to Sacramento to help create a “vision statement” for the River District in the early stages of development.

“I’m really excited about it,” he said. “It really pays homage to the historic aspect of the River District, which was of course the produce district in Sacramento for many, many years.”

He said, moving forward, the developer will not need city council approval. The next step, he said, is to finalize building plans and obtain permits.

The plans currently include 525 housing units and commercial space geared towards startups and entrepreneurial opportunities.

It is expected rent for both the housing units — expected to be mainly smaller studio spaces — and the commercial spaces would be relatively inexpensive due to the area in which they are building.

“It’s really focused on younger people, millennials, the entrepreneurial spirit of younger people,” he said.

Harris said he hoped construction would start in 2023 with “substantial buildout” within three years.

Comments are closed.