Stockton apartment explosion leaves elderly displaced for the holidays

Spending Christmas alone at a hotel with little to no personal belongings is not what a group of elderly Stockton residents had in mind.But this is their reality after an explosion damaged multiple units at the Inglewood Gardens apartments weeks prior and left them displaced. Dawn Cannon had lived there for one year and said the stress of the situation had impacted her physically, resulting in a substantial and sudden weight loss. “This is the most traumatic thing that I’ve ever experienced,” Cannon said. She and other displaced tenants said they likely won’t be able to see their families for the holidays. “I can’t even think of Christmas,” Canon said. “I don’t care about Christmas. I just want to talk to my grandchildren on that day.”Their lives changed in the blink of an eye after an explosion damaged large portions of their building. Drew Magnus said he is still recovering from injuries he sustained from flying objects during the explosion. Bruises were visible on his eye and forehead.”Up until now, I can still feel pain,” Magnus said. The only thing on their Christmas lists this year is the chance to go back home, or at least have a piece of it.Inglewood Gardens sent forms to the tenants for them to schedule a time to collect their belongings. But the tenants question if this would be possible. Damages were spread around the building and some windows and doors were boarded up. With a fence blocking off the perimeter of the building, the tenants, especially those with physical disabilities, wonder how and if they ‘ll be able to come back for their belongings.Most of the tenants rely on walkers and wheelchairs and say they struggled to move just through the multiple-story hotel they are staying at. Management did not respond to KCRA 3’s request for comment.” I don’t have no one to help me move stuff,” said tenant Jeff Defrenchi. “I wanted to go there the other day just to see what I have left. I’m not sure what I’ve got.”Some of the items they left behind include family photos, personal documents and family heirlooms. Tenants say the Inglewood Gardens property management has pre-paid a two-month stay at a local hotel, but they are unsure where they will go from there.”After that, we’re on our own,” Magnus said. “I don’t have the funds to stay longer in this hotel, or elsewhere.”While they won’t have a holiday celebration, the tenants say they are grateful to have each other to lean on as they wait for answers. “It means the world to me,” Canon said. “I think it’s going to help me heal.”The cause of the explosion is under investigation.

Spending Christmas alone at a hotel with little to no personal belongings is not what a group of elderly Stockton residents had in mind.

But this is their reality after an explosion damaged multiple units at the Inglewood Gardens apartments weeks prior and left them displaced.

Dawn Cannon had lived there for one year and said the stress of the situation had impacted her physically, resulting in a substantial and sudden weight loss.

“This is the most traumatic thing that I’ve ever experienced,” Cannon said.

She and other displaced tenants said they likely won’t be able to see their families for the holidays.

“I can’t even think of Christmas,” Canon said. “I don’t care about Christmas. I just want to talk to my grandchildren on that day.”

Their lives changed in the blink of an eye after an explosion damaged large portions of their building.

Drew Magnus said he is still recovering from injuries he sustained from flying objects during the explosion. Bruises were visible on his eye and forehead.

“Up until now, I can still feel pain,” Magnus said.

The only thing on their Christmas lists this year is the chance to go back home, or at least have a piece of it.

Inglewood Gardens sent forms to the tenants for them to schedule a time to collect their belongings. But the tenants question if this would be possible.

Damages were spread around the building and some windows and doors were boarded up.

With a fence blocking off the perimeter of the building, the tenants, especially those with physical disabilities, wonder how and if they’ll be able to come back for their belongings.

Most of the tenants rely on walkers and wheelchairs and say they struggled to move just through the multiple-story hotel they are staying at.

Management did not respond to KCRA 3’s request for comment.

“I don’t have no one to help me move stuff,” said tenant Jeff Defrenchi. “I wanted to go there the other day just to see what I have left. I’m not sure what I’ve got.”

Some of the items they left behind include family photos, personal documents and family heirlooms.

Tenants say the Inglewood Gardens property management has pre-paid a two-month stay at a local hotel, but they are unsure where they will go from there.

“After that, we’re on our own,” Magnus said. “I don’t have the funds to stay longer in this hotel, or elsewhere.”

While they won’t have a holiday celebration, the tenants say they are grateful to have each other to lean on as they wait for answers.

“It means the world to me,” Canon said. “I think it’s going to help me heal.”

The cause of the explosion is under investigation.

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